The earthy heat from the dried chiles stands up well to grilled meats like skirt steak and pork tenderloin. Read the label before buying: Some dried chiles are super hot. You may want to use gloves to remove the very spicy seeds.

Julia Dowling Rutland
Recipe by Coastal Living March 2014

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Credit: Iain Bagwell; Styling: Kristen Shelton Fielder

Recipe Summary

prep:
15 mins
stand:
20 mins
cook:
7 mins
total:
42 mins
Yield:
Makes 5 cups
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat broiler with oven rack 5 inches from heat. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.

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  • Place garlic, tomatoes, and onion, cut sides down, on prepared baking sheet. Broil 5 minutes or until skins are blackened. Set aside.

  • Wipe chiles clean with a damp cloth. Remove and discard seeds and stems. Peel garlic.

  • Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add chiles and cook, turning often, 2 minutes or until dark and toasted. (Do not burn.) Transfer chiles to a bowl; cover with 1 cup boiling water. Let stand 20 minutes or until softened.

  • Transfer chiles to a food processor with a slotted spoon, reserving soaking liquid. Add reserved garlic, tomatoes, and onion. Pulse until finely chopped. Add salt, cumin, and lime juice; pulse until well blended. Add reserved soaking liquid if necessary to achieve desired consistency. Cover and chill.

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