Leigh Beisch
Yield
Makes 8 to 10 small-plate servings

Notes: Chinese five spice is available in the spice section of many supermarkets. You can roast the pork (through step 2) up to 1 day ahead; let cool, then cover and chill. Bring to room temperature to serve.

How to Make It

Step 1

In a small bowl, mix hoisin sauce, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, and Chinese five spice, if using. Rinse pork and pat dry; place in a heavy 1-gallon zip-lock plastic bag. Add half the hoisin mixture, seal bag, and gently rotate to coat pork with marinade. Chill at least 1 hour or up to 1 day. Cover and chill remaining marinade.

Step 2

Lift pork from marinade (discard used marinade) and set on a rack in a foil-lined 9- by 13-inch baking pan. Bake in a 425° regular or convection oven for 20 minutes. Baste with reserved marinade and continue roasting, basting occasionally, until a thermometer inserted into center of tenderloin reaches 155°, 20 to 30 minutes longer. Let rest at least 5 minutes.

Step 3

Slice pork thinly across the grain and arrange on a platter. Garnish with cilantro sprigs, if using. Serve warm or cool, with hot mustard for dipping.

Step 4

Hot Mustard: In a small bowl, mix 3 tablespoons dry mustard with 2 tablespoons cold water. Let stand about 5 minutes. Stir in1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil. Makes about 3 tablespoons.

Ratings & Reviews

hparrish's Review

hparrish
May 01, 2010
The March 2004 issue of Sunset had an article on Asian small plates, of which this was one. I've gone back to that issue so many times the pages are tattered. If you're looking for the other recipes (since myrecipes doesn't link them), they are: Drunken Chicken; Hot Sichuan-Style Green Beans; Soy-Braised Mushrooms; Thai-Style Cabbage Slaw; Sesame Noodle Salad; Hoisin Pork with Hot Mustard; Sweet-Hot Coconut Shrimp; Mandarin-Berry Almond Floats;