Rating: 5 stars
9 Ratings
  • 1 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 5 star values: 8

More of a game plan than a set recipe, this dish lends itself to an assortment of ingredients you may have on hand. For example, if you can't find capocollo—cured sausage similar to salami—substitute salami or pepperoni. Serve the platter while vegetables are warm or at room temperature.

Bill and Cheryl Jamison
Recipe by Cooking Light June 2009

Gallery

Randy Mayor; Stylist: Leigh Ann Ross

Recipe Summary

Yield:
4 servings (serving size: about 4 ounces eggplant, 1 tomato half, 2 bell pepper halves, 1/2 zucchini, 1/4 onion, 1 ounce prosciutto, 1/4 ounce capocollo, 1/2 ounce mozzarella, 1 1/2 teaspoons basil, 1/2 teaspoon capers, 1 1/2 olives, and 1 tablespoon mari
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Prepare grill to medium-high heat.

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  • To prepare dressing, combine first 5 ingredients in a bowl, stirring with a whisk.

  • To prepare vegetables, brush 1/4 cup dressing evenly over tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, onion, and eggplant. Place vegetables on grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 5 minutes on each side or until lightly charred. Arrange vegetables on platter; brush with remaining dressing. Arrange prosciutto, capocollo, and cheese on platter. Sprinkle platter with basil, capers, olives, and 1/8 teaspoon salt.

  • Wine note: Easygoing tannins make northern Italy's Valpolicella the go-to red wine for cured meats. Without the use of oak, Tenuta Sant'Antonio Nanfré Valpolicella 2007 ($13) lets its fruit flavors shine. The cherry flavors and earthy notes meld beautifully with the charred vegetables. —Jeffery Lindenmuth

Nutrition Facts

291 calories; fat 13.2g; saturated fat 4.6g; mono fat 5.5g; poly fat 1.6g; protein 15.6g; carbohydrates 32g; fiber 10.1g; cholesterol 36.2mg; iron 2.3mg; sodium 986mg; calcium 147mg.
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