Twitter thread sparks fiery discussion.

By Tim Nelson
July 12, 2019
MCCAIG/Getty Images

More than anything, the internet is a forum where people come together to argue about the relative quality and ideal preparation methods of various foodstuffs. With the summer heating up, it’s only natural that the discussion has turned to a food that, while associated with a near-universal summertime activity, leaves plenty of room for disagreement about how the best way to make it.

I’m talking, of course, about roasted marshmallows. A recent Twitter debate reveals what anyone who’s already spent enough time around a campfire knows to be true: there’s a wide range of preferences when it comes to how the s’more’s centerpiece is to be prepared.

It started with this tweet from Yashar Ali, who waded into the smore debate despite spending his days as a freelance political correspondent. Ali expressed his preference for a middle-of-the-road roast to his marshmallow: enough to get some toastiness and some color, but without charring the thing to oblivion.

 

From where I sit, that seemed like a fairly quotidian preference. But—Twitter being Twitter—it wasn’t long before others emerged from the woodwork to strongly express their opposition.

If you’re a spokesperson for the NRA, apparently 8 is an acceptable answer.

Some weighed in with expert advice.

A lot of people have a routine habit of dropping their marshmallows in the fire and playing it off like that’s what they meant to do.

And some were just marshmallow anarchists.

At least one expert roaster thought that the 1-10 scale wasn’t nuanced enough.

And finally, a thread about food isn’t complete until Chrissy Teigen chimes in.

Personally, I’d peg myself at about a six or a seven. I still want to taste what I’m eating, after all, and dealing with the burnt husk of a marshmallow that you’d get with a nine or a ten isn’t worth putting up with just to get at whatever’s still edible inside.

There’s obviously no real right or wrong answer, but if you take a look around the campfire next time you’re roasting marshmallows, you may be surprised by what you see.  

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