According to this survey, at least.

By Tim Nelson
June 13, 2019
PHOTO: HECTOR MANUEL SANCHEZ, PROP STYLING: HEATHER CHADDUCK HILLEGAS; FOOD STYLING: TORIE COX

If you grew up like any normal kid, you likely regarded broccoli as an unwelcome obstacle standing between you and dessert. And if you’re of a certain age, you may have leveraged George H.W. Bush’s famous dislike of broccoli as an excuse not to eat it yourself. You’d hardly think anyone who’s not an aspiring Instagram wellness influencer would admit to actually loving the stuff.

WATCH: How to Make Copycat Panera Broccoli Cheddar Soup

Welp, it turns out that there are a lot of freaks around the country willing to go on record and admit that broccoli is their favorite vegetable. That’s according to survey data from Green Giant, who polled 5,000 (mostly incorrect) Americans to find out about the favorite vegetable of each state. The results somehow revealed that broccoli is the most-liked vegetable in a shocking 39 out of 50 states. Or 38, if you go by the infographic that I obsessively counted through because I’m losing my mind.

Green Giant

Apparently this isn’t some 2019 aberration, either: broccoli also was America’s favorite vegetable in 2018. In fact, even more states seem to love broccoli than they did last year. I feel like I’m being gaslit right now.

So what states were brave enough to stand up to those menacing green stalks? Corn, which is available in high-fructose syrup form and can be found in pretty much everything, was the runner-up in state favorites with seven. Asparagus (Alaska) and Cauliflower (Montana) showed up on the map for the first time. Potatoes, which I’m still not convinced should count as a vegetable, was only favored by Arkansas. Cucumber, which is essentially crunchy water, disappeared from the list in 2019.

Read more: 35 Recipes to Make With a Bag of Frozen Broccoli

It’s worth taking these results with a grain of salt. This was an open-ended survey where people could say whatever they want (hence Arkansans not knowing what is and isn’t a vegetable), and a poll of 5,000 across the US only averages out to 100 respondents per state—hardly representative of 327+ million Americans.

Still, at least some percentage of 5,000 people out there hold wrong, terrifying opinions and should be avoided at all costs. Eat some carrots, people.

Read more: What is The Difference Between Romanesco, Cauliflower, and Broccoli?

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