Nicole finds out what the kids are really up to these days.

By Annie Campbell
May 08, 2020
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Put down the chip clips! Stop your cereal pouring! 

TikTok has introduced us to some kitchen hacks that the internet has found revolutionary. These quick videos demonstrate new methods for storing, cooking, and eating food, but we were skeptical to see how useful these tricks really are in daily life. So, we got our Mom Vs. star, Nicole McLaughlin, to put them to the test. Here’s what she thought about the 6 latest food hacks on TikTok. 

Folding a Chip Bag Closed

If you thought chip clips were essential to closing an unfinished bag of chips, think again. This TikTok demonstrates a method that doesn’t require a securing method at all. Rather than folding the top of the bag over completely, fold down the two corners and overlap them so that the top of the bag forms a point. Grab the edges of the two downward folds, and start rolling upwards toward the point. Finally, tuck the point of the bag into the roll, and roll the entire section back down. This should keep your chips fresh and secure in the bag. Nicole noted that this method really only works with traditional style chip bags and when the bag is about half empty. That being said, if you have no clips on hand, this trick really does do the job.

Closing a Cereal Box

You’ve probably relied on the little cardboard tab and slit on the top of a cereal box to close it all your life, but TikTok users might just be changing the game. The new method folds the cardboard in on itself to create a triangular shape at the top. Here’s how it’s done: Fold down one of the long flaps, pinch in the skinny sides of the box using both hands, and tuck the remaining flap into the box, and squeeze tightly to secure. Voila! Your cereal box looks neat and tidy. While it does look pretty cool, this hack doesn’t provide much of a practical purpose, and Nicole found it challenging to achieve a tight seal. Make sure the bag of cereal inside is totally closed before trying to keep it fresh.

Separating Egg Yolks

Instead of precariously juggling an egg yolk back and forth between two halves of an eggshell, try this hack for separating an egg yolk from the white. First, crack an egg on a plate. Next, grab an empty water bottle, squeeze it from the center, and release it when the spout of the bottle is completely touching the egg yolk. The bottle will create just enough suction to lift the round yolk off the plate, allowing you to transfer it to another plate. White Nicole found this method to be cool, she thinks she’ll stick to the old-fashioned way. 

Eating Cereal

Nicole found this next hack to be a breakfast game-changer: Pouring milk before cereal. While this might seem incredibly simple and maybe unremarkable, this trick can keep your cereal crispier longer. When milk is poured on top of cereal, all of the dry cereal is saturated at once. When cereal is poured on top, only the bottom layer of cereal touches the milk, while the rest floats on the surface. Nicole’s review says it all: “I LOVE this…because I HATE soggy cereal!”

Using a Vegetable Peeler

Turns out, a vegetable peeler can peel in more than one direction! If this blows your mind, you’re not alone. A vegetable peeler can be used in an upward AND downward motion to speed up the peeling process (and decrease the arm workout). Even though it works, Nicole had a few thoughts on the method: “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.  It works and saves a little time, but the user needs to be quite skilled as not to damage any knuckles.”

Eating a Cupcake

Last but not least, here is Nicole’s favorite hack of all. Eating a cupcake piled high with icing can leave you with a mouthful of clumpy, sugary frosting (not to mention the dry cake left behind). Instead of dealing with that disappointing bite, try this simple technique. Remove the cupcake wrapper, then tear (or slice) off the bottom half of the cupcake. Flip it over, set it on top of the icing, and you’ve got yourself a cupcake sandwich. Nicole swears this trick creates the perfect frosting to cake ratio, calling the method “genius.”