Stuffed Peppers

Stuffed Peppers Recipe
Oxmoor House
Beef and rice seasoned with herbs and a robust pasta sauce fill these tender, flavorful peppers. If you don't have dried Italian seasoning, use 1/2 teaspoon dried basil and 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano. Make sure the bell peppers are 10 ounces or larger so the beef stuffing will fit.

Yield:

4 servings (serving size: 1/2 pepper)

Recipe from

Oxmoor House

Recipe Time

Prep: 4 Minutes
Cook: 10 Minutes

Nutritional Information

Calories 312
Caloriesfromfat 0.0 %
Fat 9.8 g
Satfat 4.6 g
Monofat 3.3 g
Polyfat 1.5 g
Protein 27.4 g
Carbohydrate 29.9 g
Fiber 4.1 g
Cholesterol 61 mg
Iron 2.4 mg
Sodium 543 mg
Calcium 242 mg

Ingredients

2 large green bell peppers (about 10 ounces each)
3/4 pound ground sirloin
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 (8.8-ounce) package precooked whole-grain brown rice (such as Uncle Ben's)
1 cup tomato-basil pasta sauce (such as Classico)
1 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese

Preparation

1. Cut bell peppers in half lengthwise; discard seeds and membranes. Place bell pepper halves, cut sides up, in an 11 x 7–inch baking dish. Microwave at HIGH 6 to 7 minutes or until tender.

2. While bell peppers cook, heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook beef and onion until browned, stirring to crumble beef. Drain, if necessary; return to pan. Stir in dried Italian seasoning, salt, black pepper, brown rice, and pasta sauce. Cook 1 to 2 minutes or until warm, stirring occasionally.

3. Fill bell pepper halves with beef mixture; sprinkle evenly with cheese. Microwave at HIGH 2 to 3 minutes or until cheese melts.

Choice ingredient

Microwaveable precooked rice, such as whole-grain brown, long-grain white, jasmine, or basmati, is a great shortcut instead of cooking rice from scratch. Precooked rice can be used as a stuffing, stirred into soups, or served as a healthy ninety-second side. It comes in an assortment of flavors, but be sure to look at each one's nutrition label—some seasoned varieties can be high in sodium.