Short Rib "Steaks" with Grilled Kimchi

Photo: Annabelle Breakey
Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi serve these juicy, well-marbled boned short ribs with housemade kimchi at their restaurant Joule, in Seattle. For grilling the kimchi, you'll need a metal rack (the kind for cooling cookies works well) or perforated grill pan.

Yield:

Serves 4

Recipe from

Recipe Time

Total: 1 Hour, 15 Minutes

Nutritional Information

Calories 535
Caloriesfromfat 51 %
Protein 43 g
Fat 31 g
Satfat 10 g
Carbohydrate 6.8 g
Fiber 2.3 g
Sodium 686 mg
Cholesterol 116 mg

Ingredients

1 cup peeled, coarsely chopped Asian pear
3/4 cup chopped onion
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh ginger
3 garlic cloves
1/2 cup sake
1/2 cup mirin
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 1/2 pounds boned beef short ribs* trimmed of silverskin and outer fat, 3/4 to 1 in. thick; or 4 boneless beef country-style ribs (1 1/2 lbs. total), trimmed
3 cups drained mild or spicy kimchi*
2 tablespoons canola oil
Steamed short-grain white rice (optional)

Preparation

1. Whirl pear, onion, ginger, garlic, sake, mirin, and soy sauce in a blender until puréed. Pour into a deep bowl, add short ribs, and chill 3 to 4 hours. Drain marinade and let meat come to room temperature, about 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, heat grill to medium (350° to 450°) for a gas grill or hot (450° to 550°) for a charcoal grill, with a burner turned off or an area left clear for indirect heat. In a bowl, toss kimchi with oil and set aside. Grill meat, covered, over direct heat, turning once, until marks appear, 4 minutes total.

3. Transfer meat to indirect heat area and set a metal rack over direct heat, crosswise over grates. Cook steak over indirect heat until a thermometer reaches 125° for medium-rare, 6 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, grill kimchi on rack, turning once, until lightly charred, about 8 minutes total. Set kimchi on a platter with steaks on top, and serve with rice if you like.

*Short ribs don't come already boned, so you can ask a butcher to do it, bone them yourself (3 3/4 lbs. yields 1 1/2 lbs. trimmed "steaks"), or substitute boneless beef country-style ribs, a cut from the chuck eye roll that's similar in flavor, though less marbled. Find kimchi in grocery stores' refrigerated foods section and at Asian markets.

Note:

Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi,

Joule and Revel restaurants, Seattle,

May 2012