Seared Tuna and Radish Salad with Wasabi Dressing

Seared Tuna and Radish Salad with Wasabi Dressing Recipe
Randy Mayor
The tuna is seared in this recipe, but you can serve it raw if you purchase sushi-grade fish.

Yield:

4 servings (serving size: 5 ounces fish, 3/4 cup salad, and 2 tablespoons dressing)

Recipe from

Cooking Light

Nutritional Information

Calories 280
Caloriesfromfat 12 %
Fat 3.6 g
Satfat 0.5 g
Monofat 1 g
Polyfat 1 g
Protein 41.8 g
Carbohydrate 10.7 g
Fiber 1.1 g
Cholesterol 77 mg
Iron 2.2 mg
Sodium 428 mg
Calcium 64 mg

Ingredients

Salad:
1/2 cup fresh snow peas
1 cup torn Bibb lettuce
1 cup thinly sliced radishes (about 4 ounces)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons radish sprouts
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 tablespoons mirin (sweet rice wine)
1 teaspoon canola oil
4 (6-ounce) sushi-grade tuna steaks
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Dressing:
3 tablespoons silken tofu
1 1/2 tablespoons wasabi powder
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon mirin (sweet rice wine)
5 tablespoons water

Preparation

To prepare salad, cook snow peas in boiling water 3 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain and rinse with cold water; drain. Thinly slice snow peas crosswise. Combine peas and next 7 ingredients (through 1 1/2 tablespoons mirin) in a medium bowl; set aside.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle the fish with salt. Add fish to the pan; cook 2 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness. Let stand 2 minutes. Cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices.

To prepare dressing, combine tofu and next 4 ingredients (through 1 tablespoon mirin) in a food processor, and process until smooth. With processor on, slowly pour water through food chute; process until well blended. Serve fish over salad; drizzle with dressing just before serving.

Note:

MyRecipes is working with Let's Move!, the Partnership for a Healthier America, and USDA's MyPlate to give anyone looking for healthier options access to a trove of recipes that will help them create healthy, tasty plates. For more information about creating a healthy plate, visit www.choosemyplate.gov.

Michel Nischan,

Homegrown Pure and Simple: Great Healthy Food from Garden to Table

March 2006
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