Piña Colada Cheesecake Bars

Pina Colada Cheesecake Bars Recipe
Photo: Oxmoor House
This recipe uses a small amount of coconut flour, which is slightly sweet, high in fiber (3 grams per tablespoon), and gluten free. Look for it in health-food stores or order online. You also can substitute an equal amount of gluten-free all-purpose flour.


16 servings (serving size: 1 bar)

Recipe from

Oxmoor House

Nutritional Information

Calories 117
Fat 4.6 g
Satfat 2.2 g
Monofat 1.2 g
Polyfat 0.7 g
Protein 4.1 g
Carbohydrate 15.4 g
Fiber 0.9 g
Cholesterol 6 mg
Iron 0.5 mg
Sodium 142 mg
Calcium 27 mg


1 cup gluten-free graham cracker crumbs
2 tablespoons coconut flour
2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 tablespoon water
Cooking spray
1 cup 2% low-fat cottage cheese
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup (2 ounces) block-style fat-free cream cheese, softened
1 1/2 tablespoons grated lemon rind
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon pineapple juice
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
Dash of salt
3/4 cup egg substitute
1 cup chopped fresh pineapple
1/4 cup shredded unsweetened coconut, toasted


1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. Combine first 4 ingredients in a bowl. Add butter, oil, and 1 tablespoon water; toss well. Press mixture into bottom of an 8-inch square metal baking pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 10 minutes. Cool completely on a wire rack.

3. Place cottage cheese and next 7 ingredients in a food processor; process until smooth. Add egg substitute, and process until blended. Spread cheese mixture over cooled crust. Bake at 350° for 33 minutes or until set. Cool 10 minutes on a wire rack. Refrigerate 2 hours or until thoroughly chilled. Top with pineapple and coconut. Cut into 16 bars.


Standard lemons work well in this recipe, but Meyer lemons, which have a sweeter flavor, are a delicious substitute if you can find them in good condition. Often, you'll find lemons that are too soft, or dry and shriveled. Avoid these. What you want are plump, shiny-skinned fruits that are firm but not hard and seemingly heavy for their size, which is a good sign that they're full of juice.

Elisa Bosley,

Cooking Light Gluten-Free Cookbook,

Oxmoor House

August 2011
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