Yield
Makes 4 servings

The ostrich has no breast meat--it's mostly leg and thigh, plus a strip from the back called the tenderloin. The tenderloin and some cuts from the thigh (top loin, fan, oyster, and inside and outside strip) are quite tender. Others are chewier. Ostrich meat that is cut into neat slices or re-formed into steaks called medallions or mignons cooks quite evenly.

How to Make It

Step 1

Rinse ostrich and pat dry.

Step 2

In a 10- to 12-inch frying pan over high heat, melt butter. When hot, add ostrich in a single layer. Brown on each side, cooking until rare or medium-rare (red in center, cut to test), 4 to 5 minutes total, or to taste (well-done ostrich is dry).

Step 3

Remove pan from heat, quickly transfer the meat to a platter, and keep it warm.

Step 4

Add port, cream, and cheese to pan; stir over high heat until reduced to about 1/3 cup. Pour sauce over the meat. Season to taste with pepper and salt.

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