Linguine with Snow Peas, Cucumber, and Peanut Sauce

Kids will be especially fond of this Asian-inspired noodle dish--after all, the sauce is made with peanut butter--but the combination of cooked and raw vegetables is refreshing and satisfying enough to please all ages. Serve the pasta immediately after tossing it with the peanut mixture; the sauce gets thick if it sits too long.

Yield:

4

Recipe from


Ingredients

2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/3 cup peanut butter
2/3 cup canned low-sodium chicken broth or homemade stock
1 1/2 tablespoons lime juice
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
3/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 pound linguine
1/2 pound snow peas, cut diagonally into thin slices
1 1/2 cups bean sprouts (about 1/4 pound)
2 scallions including green tops, chopped
1 cucumber, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, and sliced thin
1/2 cup chopped peanuts

Preparation

1. In a blender or food processor, combine the garlic, soy sauce, peanut butter, chicken broth, lime juice, red-pepper flakes, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt. Puree until smooth.

2. In a large pot of boiling, salted water, cook the linguine until almost done, about 9 minutes. Stir in the snow peas and bean sprouts and cook until the vegetables and pasta are just done, about 3 minutes more. Drain and toss with the peanut sauce, the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, the scallions, cucumber, and 1/3 cup of the peanuts. Serve with the remaining peanuts sprinkled over the top.

Wine Recommendation: Choose a simple kabinett riesling from the Rheinhessen. These rieslings' piquant juxtaposition of fruity acids and balancing sweetness is the perfect foil for the salty and spicy flavors of Asian cuisine.

Notes: Though they're certainly edible, the seeds from a mature cucumber can be somewhat watery. You can simply scoop them out of a halved cucumber with a spoon and discard them--or buy an English (hothouse) cucumber, which is almost completely seedless.

Note:

Quick from Scratch Vegetable Main Dishes

January 1998