Chunky Two-Bean and Beef Chili

Chunky Two-Bean and Beef Chili Recipe
Becky Luigart-Stayner
Garnish with Monterey Jack cheese, chopped onion, chopped cilantro, and chopped tomato.

Yield:

6 servings (serving size: about 1 1/3 cups)

Recipe from

Cooking Light

Nutritional Information

Calories 390
Caloriesfromfat 26 %
Fat 11.4 g
Satfat 3.2 g
Monofat 4.8 g
Polyfat 1.1 g
Protein 31.3 g
Carbohydrate 37.5 g
Fiber 10.1 g
Cholesterol 71 mg
Iron 5 mg
Sodium 825 mg
Calcium 94 mg

Ingredients

1 tablespoon canola oil, divided
Cooking spray
1 1/2 pounds beef stew meat
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
2 teaspoons finely chopped jalapeño pepper
2/3 cup Cabernet Sauvignon or dry red wine
1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 1/2 teaspoons ground ancho chile pepper
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground red pepper
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes, undrained and chopped
1 (15-ounce) can dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
1 (15-ounce) can hot chili beans

Preparation

Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a large Dutch oven coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Sprinkle beef with salt. Place half of beef in pan; sauté 8 minutes or until browned. Remove from pan. Repeat procedure with remaining beef; remove from pan.

Add 2 teaspoons oil, onion, and bell pepper to pan, and sauté for 3 minutes. Add garlic and jalapeño; sauté for 1 minute. Add wine, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Return beef to pan.

Stir in remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 1 1/2 hours or until beef is tender, stirring occasionally.

Wine note: Hearty, spicy dishes like this chili need a wine that's gutsy enough to stand up not just to the chili pepper, chile powder, cumin, and other spices, but also to the beans and beef. My top pick: a juicy Australian shiraz. Its mouth-filling, plush, almost syrupy softness is a great contrast to the beef and beans, and the wine's rich fruitiness cushions all that spice. There are loads of terrific Australian shirazes on the market at all price levels. The affordable Yalumba Shiraz 2003 (South Australia, $10) is priced right for chili. -Karen MacNeil

Note:

Krista Ackerbloom Montgomery & Ann Taylor Pittman,

March 2005
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