Chinese Potstickers

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner; Styling: Jan Gautro
Variations of these little dumplings are popular throughout China. They symbolize abundance and wealth for the coming year, as they are made in large amounts and, when fried golden, represent coins. In northern China they are served in the hours between the old and new year. These may take some time to prepare, but gather a few friends to help assemble the potstickers. Cook two dozen for your party, and freeze the extras for future snacks or meals. Simply pop the extra, uncooked dumplings in a heavy-duty zip-top plastic bag.

Yield:

16 servings (serving size: 3 dumplings and about 1 tablespoon sauce)

Recipe from

Nutritional Information

Calories 132
Caloriesfromfat 0.0 %
Fat 5.1 g
Satfat 0.7 g
Monofat 2.3 g
Polyfat 1.3 g
Protein 6.5 g
Carbohydrate 14.7 g
Fiber 1 g
Cholesterol 15 mg
Iron 0.8 mg
Sodium 511 mg
Calcium 23 mg

Ingredients

Dumplings:
3 cups chopped napa (Chinese) cabbage (about 4 ounces)
4 dried shiitake mushrooms (about 1 1/2 ounces)
1/4 cup finely chopped green onions
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon cornstarch, divided
1 1/2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons oyster sauce
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
5 ounces lean ground pork
5 ounces ground chicken breast
1 large egg white
48 gyoza skins
1/4 cup canola oil, divided
1 1/3 cups water, divided
Sauce:
3 tablespoons finely chopped peeled fresh ginger
2 tablespoons minced green onions
3 tablespoons dark soy sauce
6 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese black vinegar or balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons Shaoxing (Chinese cooking wine) or dry sherry
2 teaspoons chile puree with garlic sauce
2 teaspoons dark sesame oil

Preparation

1. To prepare dumplings, cook cabbage in boiling water 1 minute or until tender. Drain and rinse with cold water; drain. Cool; chop.

2. Place mushrooms in a small bowl; cover with boiling water. Cover and let stand 30 minutes or until tender. Drain mushrooms; chop.

3. Combine cabbage, mushrooms, 1/4 cup green onions, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, and next 7 ingredients (through egg white) in a large bowl. Cover and refrigerate 4 hours.

4. Working with 1 gyoza skin at a time (cover remaining gyoza skins to prevent drying), spoon 2 teaspoons pork mixture into center of each skin. Moisten edges of gyoza skin with water. Fold in half, pinching edges together to seal. Place dumpling, seam side up, on a baking sheet sprinkled with remaining 1 teaspoon cornstarch (cover loosely with a towel to prevent drying). Repeat procedure with remaining gyoza skins and filling.

5. Heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 12 dumplings to pan; cook 3 minutes. Add 1/3 cup water. Reduce heat, and simmer 3 minutes or until water evaporates. Repeat procedure with remaining canola oil, dumplings, and water.

6. To prepare the sauce, combine 3 tablespoons chopped ginger and remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Serve sauce with dumplings.

Note:

Nathan Fong,

January 2009