Brunswick Stew

Brunswick Stew Recipe
Randy Mayor; Leigh Ann Ross
Brunswick stew is a classic Southern dish featuring meat, chopped bell pepper, lima beans, and corn in a tomato base. Developed in 19th-century Virginia, this stew originally included squirrel meat (we opt here for chicken). This version uses flour to give the stew body and features garlic bread on the side. Garnish with fresh thyme sprigs.

Yield:

6 servings (serving size: 1 cup stew and 1 slice bread)

Recipe from

Nutritional Information

Calories 319
Caloriesfromfat 26 %
Fat 9.2 g
Satfat 2.2 g
Monofat 3.5 g
Polyfat 2.6 g
Protein 22.4 g
Carbohydrate 38 g
Fiber 5.8 g
Cholesterol 50 mg
Iron 3.2 mg
Sodium 596 mg
Calcium 58 mg

Ingredients

Cooking spray
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
3/4 cup chopped yellow onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 pound skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons no-salt-added tomato paste
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco)
1 (10-ounce) package frozen whole-kernel corn, thawed
1 (10-ounce) package frozen baby lima beans, thawed
6 (1-ounce) slices Italian bread, toasted
2 garlic cloves, halved

Preparation

Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add bell pepper, onion, and celery to pan; cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add oil to pan. Combine flour and chicken in a medium bowl, tossing to coat. Add chicken to pan; cook 2 minutes or until lightly browned. Gradually stir in broth; bring to a boil. Cook 1 minute or until slightly thick, stirring constantly. Add tomato paste and next 5 ingredients (through lima beans) to pan. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes.

Rub bread slices with cut sides of garlic; discard garlic. Serve bread with stew.

Note:

MyRecipes is working with Let's Move!, the Partnership for a Healthier America, and USDA's MyPlate to give anyone looking for healthier options access to a trove of recipes that will help them create healthy, tasty plates. For more information about creating a healthy plate, visit www.choosemyplate.gov.

Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough,

October 2007
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