When a recipe calls for egg substitute, can I use real eggs and what is the substitution?  

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Photo: Lee Harrelson; Styling: Ana Kelly, Mindi Shapiro

Even when the cupboard is nearly bare, if you have a few eggs you can cook up a dizzying array of meals, snacks, and even desserts. Eggs take a starring role when poached, baked, or deviled. But they're also versatile team players in casseroles, berry meringues, or breakfast bruschetta.

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One egg equals 1/4 cup egg substitute. You can almost always replace substitute with real eggs, but the reverse is not necessarily true.

Some egg substitutes are egg whites with added ingredients for color or texture. It is also possible to buy egg substitute that is both white and yolk—but again, it has been processed and will not have all the same culinary properties as a fresh egg. For example, you cannot whip egg substitute for a meringue. For more tips on using eggs in recipes, see 7 Ways with Eggs.

Marge Perry
Oct, 2010
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