Good Gravy

From giblet-laced versions straight out of Grandma's recipe book to quick five-ingredient recipes, we have gravies to suit every kind of cook and palate.

  • Classic Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, James Carrier

    Classic Gravy

    An easy version of the giblet gravy Grandma used to make, this cornstarch-thickened favorite is made by using turkey necks, giblets, carrots, celery, and onions to enhance store-bought chicken stock. Giblets can be strained out of the stock or chopped up into the finished gravy.
  • Uncle Ellis' Cornmeal Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Photo: Iain Bagwell; Styling: Annette Joseph

    Uncle Ellis' Cornmeal Gravy

    This easy gravy calls for cornmeal instead of flour, and is a wonderful use for bacon drippings. The buttermilk adds authentic Southern flavor.
  • Quick Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Photo: Sang An

    Quick Gravy

    Start with the pan juices from roasting the turkey and add broth, cornstarch, salt and pepper for this super-easy gravy.
  • Redeye Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Photo: Iain Bagwell; Styling: Annette Joseph

    Redeye Gravy

    If you serve ham at your holiday gatherings, try pairing this flavorful gravy with the ham and a heaping bowl of mashed potatoes. Redeye gravy, a traditional Southern gravy, is made from bacon and/or ham drippings mixed with black coffee. It's the perfect partner for a nice holiday ham.
  • Anytime Turkey Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan

    Anytime Turkey Gravy

    Not cooking a whole turkey but still want homemade turkey gravy? Here's a quick alternative. Sauté turkey wings and necks with some veggies and then simmer the mixture with canned chicken broth. Finish it off with poultry seasoning, sage, chopped parsley and a little bit of flour.
  • Sunset's Best Easy Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Annabelle Breakey

    Sunset's Best Easy Gravy

    Take the turkey drippings, add some stock, thicken with flour and cornstarch, and then season with salt and pepper. It's just your basic gravy with few ingredients, minimal fuss, and a big, rich turkey flavor.
  • Classic Roast Turkey with Fresh Herbs and Make-Ahead Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Randy Mayor

    Classic Roast Turkey with Fresh Herbs and Make-Ahead Gravy

    If holiday meal preparations have you stressed to the max, try this strategy for making the gravy ahead of time. On the big day, you'll just need to add drippings from the fresh cooked turkey to lend another layer of rich turkey flavor to your gravy.
  • Pork Chops with Country Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Photo: Beau Gustafson; Styling: Melanie J. Clarke

    Pork Chops with Country Gravy

    The country-style gravy that tops the chops is easily adapted to any meal for the holidays. For a different version of this same gravy, cook turkey thighs instead of pork, and dredge them in the dried herb-flour mixture. Using milk as the liquid instead of broth adds a creamy color and flavor to the thick gravy.
  • Sausage Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan

    Sausage Gravy

    A classic breakfast splurge for the holidays or any special occasion, this sausage gravy is foolproof. Five ingredients and a few minutes in the kitchen make a thick milk-based sauce that's a perfect topping for homemade biscuits or toast.
  • Pan Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Photo: Michael Paul

    Pan Gravy

    For leaner turkey gravy, use just some of the fat from the turkey pan drippings and discard the rest. Combine defatted drippings with canned stock, flour, salt and pepper for a thick, rich gravy with a little less fat than usual.
  • Pine Nut Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Jim Henkens; Karen Shinto

    Pine Nut Gravy

    Crushed pine nuts and a homemade stock made with the turkey neck and bay leaves help add an unusual but fun twist to traditional turkey gravy. The extra step of browning the flour makes for rich, mahogany colored gravy.
  • Mushroom Gravy
    Story by Maureen Callahan, Photo: Randy Mayor; Styling: Leigh Ann Ross

    Mushroom Gravy

    Sage gives this gravy a more traditional Thanksgiving flavor, but to change it up, try some chopped rosemary, tarragon, thyme, or parsley. This is slightly thinner than some gravies because we found the consistency to be more pleasing to the palate.
  • Secrets from the Test Kitchen
    Story by Maureen Callahan

    Secrets from the Test Kitchen

    For more hints and tips, check out our how-to videos with easy step-by-step instructions for making gravy and deglazing a pan.

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