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The Italian omelet-frittata hybrid you didn’t know you needed

Rebecca Firkser
January 24, 2018

If you haven’t heard of rafanata yet, listen up. A kind of omelet-frittata hybrid, this fluffy disk of horseradish, potato, and cheese bound with beaten egg is exactly what you’ve been missing all your life. OK, so it’s what I’ve been missing all my life, but I bet you’re at least interested. Its name comes from the Italian "rafano," meaning horseradish, and the flavor is wonderful. Oodles more exciting than a Plain-Jane quiche, whip out a rafanata when you’re in the mood for a savory, eggy breakfast.

Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil, then toss in 2 peeled Russet potatoes. Cook the potatoes for 10 minutes, then fish them out of the water and turn off the heat. Let the potatoes cool a bit, then move them to a cutting board. Slice the potatoes very thinly (think less than ¼-inch).

Heat a large skillet with plenty of olive oil over medium high heat. Fry the potato slices until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side. Depending on how large your pan is, you may need to fry the potatoes in shifts. When the potatoes are golden brown, turn them out onto a plate lined with paper towels. Wipe out the skillet and set aside.

In a large bowl, beat 6 eggs with ½ cup water, ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese, and 2 tablespoons jarred horseradish. Season the mixture with ½ teaspoon kosher salt and black pepper. Drop the fried potato slices into the egg mixture and stir until fully incorporated.

Heat 2 tablespoons more olive oil in the skillet over medium, then pour in the egg and potato mixture. Let the mixture cook for at least 5 minutes before checking underneath to make sure it’s cooking. Now, with confidence, flip the rafanata out onto a plate so the cooked side is exposed (the best way to do this is to place a large dinner plate over the pan, then flip the pan, catching the rafanata). Slide the rafanata back into the pan, cooked side up, and cook for another 3-5 minutes.

Slide the rafanata out onto a serving plate and slice into wedges. Serve with sour cream, mustard, or solo.

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