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The Capsulier Revo could be a game changer, assuming it gets past the Kickstarter stage

Mike Pomranz
January 31, 2018

No one denies the convenience of single-serve, pod-based coffeemakers like Keurig or Nespresso. Instead, more typical complaints tend to be the environmental impact of the disposable coffee pods themselves, the per-cup cost, and the quality of the coffee. But even though making coffee from a pod may never be as cool as methods like pour-overs and French press, a startup called Capsulier hopes to solve all of those other issues by allowing people to make Nespresso reusable pods at home with fresh-ground coffee beans they choose themselves.

For Nespresso users, the Capsulier Revo sounds like a dream come true: Simply put coffee beans into the machine, which will then grind them for you and package them into “Capsi,” reusable stainless steel pods. According to CNET, the device plans to come with four of these Capsi and can prep up to eight at a time (if you’re willing to shell out the extra cash for a few more of them). Meanwhile, Capsulier promises that Keurig users have no reason to worry either: They’re working on a version for packaging your own K-cups as well.

However, don’t get your hopes up yet: For now, the Hong King-based startup has only made its machines available via Kickstarter and the delivery dates are quite a ways out. The Revo isn’t slated to be delivered until December and the still unnamed K-cup version isn’t scheduled to be finished until 2019. That said, doubters might be reassured by the fact that apparently, Capsulier was showing off the machines at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show. Also, compared to some appliances, the Revo actually seems to come in at a reasonable price tag: Though the $179 “super early bird” discounts are all sold out, the machine can still be picked up for about $205.

The Kickstarter hasn’t quite reached its goal yet, but it’s running for 14 more days, and though as with any Kickstarter, it pays to be a bit skeptical, at the very least, as a concept, Capsulier seems pretty ingenious on paper.

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine

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